Road & Travel Magazine

 
   
RTM WWW
                Bookmark and Share  



Automotive Channel

Auto Advice & Tips
Auto Products
Auto Buyer's Guides
Car Care Maintenance
Earth Aware Awards
Insurance & Accidents
I
nternational Awards
Legends & Leaders
New Car Reviews
Planet Driven
Road Humor
Road Trips
Safety & Security
Teens & Tots
Tire Buying Tips
Used Car Buying
Vehicle Model Guide
What Women Want

Travel Channel
Adventure Travel
Advice & Tips
Airline Rules
Bed & Breakfasts
Cruises & Tours
Destination Reviews
Earth Tones
Family Travel Tips
Health Trip
Hotels & Resorts
Luxury Travel
Pet Travel
Safety & Security
Spa Reviews
Train Vacations
Travel Products
Travel Directory
What Women Want

Follow Us
Facebook | Pinterest
Can Your Car Run On E85?

Can Your Car Run on E85?

E85. The name probably sounds quite familiar to you. With an overwhelming amount of media attention focused on rising gas prices, the idea of this new fuel — which touts a vastly higher ethanol to gas ratio (85 percent ethanol to 15 percent gasoline versus the standard 10 percent or less in typical gasoline) — is turning more than a few heads. In fact, big automakers like General Motors are bringing products built with engines designed specifically for flex fuels such as E85 to the market at an alarming speed. Even the president is singing praises for the new pump option, which will eliminate a sturdy chunk of the country's dependence on foreign oil.

Until recently, few gas stations have offered E85, making it a problem for flex fuel car owners to fill up with the plant-based blend consistently. Now, many gas suppliers are taking advantage of the media frenzy to add the good stuff to their line.

Yet a recent study performed by cars.com (online auto marketplace) revealed that 46 percent of car buyers didn't know enough about E85 to feel comfortable even considering a flex fuel vehicle for purchase.

Revelations among another shocking study, this one by GM, confirmed that 70 percent of its flex fuel vehicle owners didn't even know that their car could run on E85.

Below, we've listed a few pros and cons of to help educate you on the new fuel:

Positive Benefits:

  • It is a renewable fuel

  • Uses up to 85 percent less imported petroleum

  • Less money goes overseas

  • Consumers don't have to pay a premium for a flexible-fuel car versus the same model with a standard, gasoline-only engine

    Negative Benefits:

  • Gets fewer miles per gallon than regular gas, so consumers aren't
    likely to save any money on fuel given the current cost of E85

  • Environmental benefits unclear

    So, for all of those unknowing car owners out there, here's a list of '06 models that can use E85 — you might be surprised to find that you have one in your garage...

  • 2006 Flex Fuel Vehicles

    Vehicle
    Gas MPG
    (city/hwy)
    E85 MPG
    (city/hwy)
    Passenger Cars
    Chevrolet Impala
    21/31
    16/23
    Chevrolet Monte Carlo
    21/31
    16/24
    Ford Crown Victoria
    17/25
    12/18
    Lincoln Town Car
    17/25
    12/18
    Mercury Grand Marquis
    17/25
    12/18
     
    SUVs
    Chevrolet Avalanche
    14/19
    11/14
    Chevrolet Suburban
    14/19
    11/14
    Chevrolet Tahoe
    15/20
    11/15
    GMC Yukon
    15/20
    11/15
    GMC Yukon XL
    14/19
    11/14
     
    Pickup Trucks
    Chevrolet Silverado
    16/20
    12/16
    Ford F-150
    14/19
    11/14
    GMC Sierra
    16/20
    12/16
    Nissan Titan
    14/19
    10/14

    For more information on E85, you can visit cars.com's E85 Consumer Guide.

    Read more articles on flex fuels and environmentally safe auto ideas at RTM's
    Earth Tones
    section.

    (Source: cars.com)

    Copyright ©2018 - 2020 | ROAD & TRAVEL Magazine | All rights reserved.